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Day’s Verse:

“Love…endures all things.”

1 Cor 13:7

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For those of you whose papers I’ve edited in the past, or those of you who have a great deal of time on your hands, or those of you who are feeling particularly masochistic, please read and comment on my MBWII paper. Short! Fun! Just what you need to unwind! (If you do so, just email me the modified document.)

Here’s my thoughtful question of the day: are women today really freer than women at the turn of the last century? I have to begin with this disclaimer, that most of what I will write I have learned in a college class. Unfortunately I cannot offer studies to back up my statements, so this must remain speculation. During that time, most women of any class had only one choice for their futures: who to marry? The solution to many social and economic problems was marriage during that time; women were looked down on for working in jobs, although lower-class women could work in factories with impunity. Factories, of course, weren’t exactly an “escape” from anything, with long hours, terrible conditions, and meagre pay. Marriage offered the only real viable option for a woman 100 years ago. Today women enjoy much greater freedom with the ability to attend college, enter the working world, and obtain a well-regulated job. However, women are still consistently paid less than men when both sexes work at the same job. In primarily female-dominated jobs, the pay is generally less than in male-dominated jobs although some women’s jobs such as social work may take as much schooling as a male-dominated field such as engineering. The man is still the breadwinner in most whole families. It seems that even today, to have a chance at real financial freedom women find themselves getting married (though I cannot claim that it is the ONLY way for women now since many women live quite happily and comfortably without husbands).

The system is down, yo.

– KF –

Countdown:

2 weeks

(“Accursed! what have I to do with days? They are too long already.”)

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