Goodbye, Favorite Scarf

Day’s Verse:
“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”
Matthew 6:19-21

Wimbledon Commons (I & K)

See the nice scarf I’m wearing in this picture of me and Ian at Wimbledon Common in March, 2004? It was brand-new in that picture; Ian gave it to me in when I met him in London after his IQP finished. It’s the Ferguson tartan, and Ian got it on his trip up to Edinburgh. After he gave me the scarf, I hardly wore anything else. It was wool, and therefore a little bit itchy, but it was fabulously warm, great for biking (believe it or not) because it stayed warm when damp, and of course it was very stylish. It kept me warm through 5 Massachusetts winters and I came to be very attached to it.

You’ve probably noticed all the past-tense, the way this sounds like a eulogy. That’s because on November 19, I wore the scarf to my AmeriCorps graduation and forgot it at the Hood River Inn. I realized my mistake the next day and contacted the Hood River Inn and the AmeriCorps organizers. The AmeriCorps organizer got back to me and said yes, they found it, and had given it to another intern who lives in Seattle to return to me. Whew, boy was I relieved! I contacted the Seattle intern and we devised a plan for me to obtain the scarf on November 26. He would leave the scarf in his mailbox, and I’d come pick it up on our way to Seaside. Alas, when I got to the mailbox, it was open and empty — no scarf to be found. The intern confirmed that he’d put the scarf into the mailbox… but somebody else, apparently, took it out. I called the post office nearest his house and talked to the carrier on that route. He didn’t see the scarf in the mailbox, and he said even if he had, he wouldn’t have removed it. I have to assume the scarf is gone, and I hope whoever stole it is staying warm with it.

It sounds funny that I’m mourning the loss of my scarf, but it’s true. It hurts that I lost something Ian gave me all those years ago, a reminder that he’d thought of me when we were apart and a symbol of my new family name. Then, too, I used it all the time — even in Washington, it was the right weight for many winter days. Also, I’m having a hard time forgiving myself for forgetting it in the first place; for coming up with an idiotic retrieval plan involving leaving the scarf in a public place; for not just waiting to get it back from the intern in person… Goodbye, favorite scarf. I miss you and I am sad that you’re gone.

PS – Oh, yes, Ian and I did get back from Seaside. We made excellent time, actually. Yesterday I did all sorts of things around the house, since I haven’t heard from the Bike Alliance on a contract yet (arrrggghh!). Today I have a bunch of errands to do. I can see that if I didn’t have a job, I’d get bored very quickly.

Seaside Day 8: Fort to Sea Hike

Day’s Verse:
Live as free people, but do not use your freedom as a cover-up for evil; live as God’s slaves.
1 Peter 2:16

Yesterday Ian and I did our most ambitious hike yet: the Fort to Sea, from Sunset Beach to Fort Clatsop and back. I call it a hike, but in places it was much more of a stroll, a walk, a perambulation, or a tromp. Here we are at the start, feeling fresh and frisky.
Fort to Sea: Start

We started by walking through a wind-ravaged clearing, crossed an amazingly elaborate pedestrian bridge:
Fort to Sea: Bridge

…and then spent a couple miles weaving through cow pastures, literally:
Fort to Sea: Cow Guard

Then, after tunneling under Highway 101, we transitioned into a some more woods and farmland.
Fort to Sea: Farmland

Good thing some genius invented trail mix. Ian carried the trail mix baggies in his jacket pockets because we didn’t have a backpack and I had used all the extra space in my camera bag with 2 PB&Js and 2 apples. I also carried a water bottle strapped to the back of my camera bag (the tripod holder, when empty, fits a Nalgene perfectly!), and Ian hand-carried another Nalgene. Next time, we’re bringing a proper backpack.
Fort to Sea: Trail Mix

After the farmland, we entered woods, but the trail remained well-maintained and graveled almost the whole way. Almost immediately we found a nice pit toilet and signs: 3 miles to Ft. Clatsop; 3 miles to Sunset Beach. Halfway there, and they gave us a potty break! Then we followed a meandering stream along the side of a valley, eventually climbing to the top of the valley for an overlook.
Fort to Sea: Overlook

The overlook was about 2.5 miles from the ocean, but it looks very far away. We gazed out for a while, ate trail mix, and moved on. The trail changed to a wide graveled road that led us almost all the way down to the road. We cross the road, meandered for about 1/4 mile (just long enough for us to wonder whether we really were near the visitor’s center), and voila!
Fort to Sea: Ft. Clatsop Visitor's Center
When we went inside, one of the rangers asked if we had a national forest pass. We were confused: Why would we need a pass? We’d just walked here from somewhere else, didn’t plan on doing anything on national forest land, and intended to turn around and walk back. Once the ranger understood our plan, she agreed we didn’t need a pass after all, but she said she hoped we’d come back and see the fort some time. So now I’ve been by Fort Clatsop twice and never seen it yet.

We used the visitor center’s facilities (aahhh, water to wash your hands!), ate lunch, and did the whole hike again — backwards! Actually, we took a the Alder Creek Loop up to the outlook, but after that it was all the same, and we didn’t walk backwards at all. too risky. Instead we walked normally and talked about number theory and different types of elves in Middle Earth. The cows had moved and were standing around one of the pass-throughs, which made us nervous. They kept eyeing us suspiciously, like they thought we’d come to steal their hay or something. We crept through carefully, only getting partly covered in 1:1 cow poop:mud goo. My boots need a good cleaning.

Here we are after 12.25 miles and 4 hours, back where we started:
Fort to Sea: End (Ian)

Fort to Sea: End (Katie)

Overall we agreed the Fort to Sea trail was a really excellent one. It had lots of different landscapes, from pastures — which you saw up close! — to lots of different types of forest to water meadow to regular meadow. Enough landmarks appeared along the way to keep it interesting, too. First you walk 2 miles and get to the Highway 101 underpass; then another mile and you get to the halfway bathrooms; another 1.5 miles takes you to the overlook, etc. It felt less like 6 miles each way than only a mile or mile and half to the next interesting point. Also, it was quite flat compared to the Tillamook Head hike, sticking closely to valleys and not needlessly hurtling over high points just for the heck of it. That made it a fairly easy 12 miles, coming in at just under 4 hours, excluding stops. I’m pretty sure we’ll be doing that hike again.

Seaside Day 6: Cannon Beach Day Trip

Day’s Verse:
Is anyone among you in trouble? Let them pray. Is anyone happy? Let them sing songs of praise.
James 5:13

Here’s another thousand-word equivalent:
Cannon Beach

I’m just kicking myself: Why didn’t I walk to the edge of the dune and then take the picture?! Fortunately, Ian and I had an excellent time in Cannon Beach regardless. We caught a bus there, spent most of the day strolling around and talking to bored shop owners, walked a good bit of the beach — from Mo’s to the river — and then caught the bus home. It only rained a little bit while we were inside eating lunch, but amazing storm clouds graced the sky the whole time. After all of that excitement, I needed a nap. Tomorrow’s looking almost as exciting.

I could get used to being on vacation.

Make Up Your Own Story!

Day’s Verse:
Who is wise and understanding among you? Let them show it by their good life, by deeds done in the humility that comes from wisdom.
James 3:13

Here are the pictures, in chronological order. Make up a story to go with them!

Picture 1:
Cannon Beach-Seaside Walk: Beginning

Picture 2:
A Seal!

Picture 3:
Looking back towards Cannon Beach

Picture 4:
Ian and the big root ball

Picture 5 and Picture 6 (simultaneous):
Cannon Beach-Seaside Walk: End (Ian)

Cannon Beach-Seaside Walk: End (Katie)

For those who just want the answer, here it is. Continue reading “Make Up Your Own Story!”

Quick Seaside Update

Day’s Verse:
In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.
James 2:17

Here we are in Seaside! The weather has held so far, giving us sun and rain showers intermittently. If we’re really on the ball we can dash outside when it’s sunny, walk around for an hour, and get home just as the pouring rain starts.

We spent the last couple days doing Seaside things, taking walks, reading indoors when it rained, and revisiting Ian’s nostalgic spots. If you’re curious where we’ve walked, check the Activities sidebar and click on any of the activities for a map and more details.

Today we got up to sun, and I felt ambitious, so I rode my bike to Fort Stevens — not a particularly challenging ride, only a little over 20 miles (in my head I now think of that as half a day’s commute) and fairly flat. The challenges weren’t terrain related: The route I’d chosen took me on non-roads, as happens sometimes when you blindly trust Google maps; the air pressure in my tires was alarmingly low, I forgot to bring a pump, and the bike shop didn’t open for an hour and a half, longer than I wanted to wait; and, although the thermometer said 40°F outside, as I rode through Gearhart I noticed ice around the edges of the puddles. Then, too, the intermittent heavy rain started up, making me glad I’d worn booties but sad I’d not worn warmer pants. I was quite cold by the time I got to Fort Stevens and (eventually) met up with Ian, who’d driven there. After I changed clothes and had a snack, I felt perky again, so we looked at the South Jetty and then checked out the wreck of the Peter Iredale a bit further on. Here’s the jetty, and an “at arm’s length” self portrait of us:

South Jetty Fort Stevens

Ian & Katie Seaside 2010

Also, we stopped at the now-open bike shop and bought a pump and some lube, both of which will reside in Seaside permanently.

The rest of the day looks like it’ll go down about like the previous days: Calm, relaxing, and literary. Thank you, Fergusons, for making it possible!

Off to See the Wizard

Day’s Verse:
Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.
James 5:16

…the wonderful Wizard of Seaside.

That just doesn’t have the same ring, somehow. In any case, Ian and I leave this morning for a little vacation to his parents’ vacation home in Seaside, Oregon. We’ll be there through next Sunday, so expect little in the way of updates for the next week or so.

Fortunately for us, the weather turned very warm yesterday a little before noon, and by this morning the snow has entirely melted. That makes the prospect of an all-day drive to the Oregon coast much more enjoyable. The forecast for Seaside: highs in the 40s and rain. I’m bringing my bike; Ian’s bringing a laptop. We should be all set.

More Snowy Thoughts

Day’s Verse:
But even if I am being poured out like a drink offering on the sacrifice and service coming from your faith, I am glad and rejoice with all of you. So you too should be glad and rejoice with me.
Philippians 2:17-18

Home in the Snow
Ian took this picture when he got home around 4:00. By the time I got home at 6:00, snow had accumulated on the road and anything wet was now ice.

I am super duper glad that I didn’t have to commute to Seattle today. The morning wasn’t remarkable, but by tonight, the roads that had previously been wet had iced over quite thoroughly. Studded bike tires would’ve gotten me home, but I wouldn’t have been happy about it. I saw a few cautious souls creeping their cars down Brickyard Road — which the City of Bothell rates as a Priority 1 snow treatment road — but I had Dad drop me off at the top and I walked home.

It took us many hours to drive to Darrington, many hours of creeping around by car on the Mountain Loop Highway to find a couple of OK trees, and many hours plus several windshield-wiper-de-icing stops to get home again. We weren’t about to slip and slide up and down our hill after all that.

But we have Christmas trees! …Actually, both will reside outside Mom and Dad’s house for a couple of weeks, until Ian and I return from Seaside. The point is, we did it and we had a fun snow adventure without any mishaps. And if Ian and I still have no groceries or dinner plans because I spent all day tree hunting with Dad, well, that’s just the price we pay.

23 Nov 2011 – Edited to add:
2011 Christmas Tree Hunting
Here’s me with one of our Christmas trees. Raaaaahhh!

PS – Jane, you can barely see it, but I’m wearing a fuzzy green hat you gave me. It was so warm and cozy! My ears say “Thank you.”